MRU #colourUblue paints Calgary blue @mountroyal4u

Colour explosion in blue at Mount Royal University's colourUblue event. © J. Ashley Nixon

Colour explosion in blue at Mount Royal University’s #colourUblue event, Calgary, Canada.
© J. Ashley Nixon

ColourUBlue

Calgary was coloured blue today.  A thousand or so Mount Royal University students picked up some nice new white t-shirts and headed off, running and walking around the Lincoln Park campus in the city’s original colour run. Before too long they encountered a barrage of water guns laden with blue paint. Then another. And another. Soon the shirts were Jackson Pollack-like, splattered and streaked.

An anthropologist goes bananas

Anthropologist Alex turns bananas at the #colourUblue event at Mount Royal University, Calgary, Canada. © J. Ashley Nixon

Anthropologist Alex turns bananas at the #colourUblue event at Mount Royal University, Calgary, Canada.
© J. Ashley Nixon

Anthropology student, Alex turned up in a banana suit. That went blue. He liked the colour explosion the best, at the end of the 5km trail. “The colours were flying in the air”, he said. “You couldn’t see anything with all the powder. It was great!” For his troubles, Alex and his team won the prize for the best dressed.

Who leads? Student and Cougar take up dancing at the #colourUblue event, Mount Royal University, Calgary, Canada. © J. Ashley Nixon

Who leads? Student and Cougar take up dancing at the #colourUblue event, Mount Royal University, Calgary, Canada.
© J. Ashley Nixon

For more photos from MRU’s #colourUblue event, please visit J. Ashley Nixon Photography

Posted in Alberta, Calgary, Canada, Canadian, Documentary photography, education, Events photography, photography, street photography, Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Mother Mother make music at the Amphitheatre, Mount Royal Univerity

Mother Mother on stage at the Ampitheatre, Mount Royal University, Calgary. © J. Ashley Nixon

Mother Mother on stage at the Ampitheatre, Mount Royal University, Calgary.
© J. Ashley Nixon

Mother Mother at #Ufest2016, Mount Royal University

It was a September night but it felt, surprisingly, like midsummer. Jet streams body-pierced a bright blue sky as golden early evening sun tilted timed reflections off the campus clock tower, casting and running across the lake at Mount Royal University (MRU). At least for a moment, there a passing thought of gladiators performing heroically in this outdoor amphitheatre. Or maybe jousters and jesters congregating in one of the three white, mediaeval-looking festival tents struck on the stage perched above the water.

In any case, a beautiful setting for Mother Mother, one of the best of fine Canadian Indie bands, to be headlining at #Ufest2016. The Vancouver-based band was playing after sets by Ria Mae from Halifax,  local act Bad Animal and folk-electro-rock artist, T. Nile to celebrate the beginning of MRU’s new academic year.

View from the back: Mount Royal University ampitheatre stage and lake during the Mother Mother gig. © J. Ashley Nixon

View from the back: Mount Royal University ampitheatre stage and lake during the Mother Mother gig.
© J. Ashley Nixon

The Guldemond siblings, Ryan (vocals & guitar) and Molly (vocals & keyboard) together with Jasmin Parkin (vocals & keyboard), Jeremy Page (bass) and Ali Siadat (drums) were back again in Calgary. Not too long since the five-piece had last gig, in July, at the Stampede. They must like it here in CowTown. The feeling was mutual amongst the big crowd of students gathered between water’s edge and the Big Rock beer garden.

Mother Mother’s set started up with Reaper Man, one of several highlights from Very Good Bad Thing, released by Universal Music Canada in 2014. This got the drinkers to finish off their beer and head down to the stage front. The band progressed through some other songs from their current album, like I Go Hungry, Modern Love and and the catchy, poppy, sing-along Monkey Tree.  Let’s Fall in Love from The Sticks and O My Heart, the opening track from the same-titled 2008 album were next.

Ryan Guldemond performing with Mother Mother at #Ufest2016, the entertainments start-up for the new academic year at Mount Royal University, Calgary. © J. Ashley Nixon

Ryan Guldemond performing with Mother Mother at #Ufest2016, the entertainments start-up for the new academic year at Mount Royal University, Calgary.
© J. Ashley Nixon

Then came a new song, called Free. It follows a common thread in Mother Mother songs about freedom and likely will feature as part of their next studio album due out in 2017. “We are repeating poetic tricks”,  said Ryan Guldemond as he introduced his song, and continued: “If you’re going to plagiarize someone, plagiarize yourself. You are still being authentic to the fraudulence within.” He liked that. Poetic indeed. Maybe it’s a line we will see in a future Mother Mother song?

A couple more songs from The Sticks were next, Infinitesimal and The Sticks itself, preceded by a tom-tom-dominated drum solo. Then came Simply Simple from the band’s third album, Eureka (2011). All of this building up to the strongest song from their MRU performance, Get Out of the Way. Chainsaw cutting keyboard riffs from Molly Guldemond and Jasmin Parkin opened this one up for a pounding bass and drum rhythm from Jeremy Page and Ali Siadat. Then three-way vocal popping over an off-beaten shaped, Dalek-like, Guldemond lyric: “I’ll write the perfect song for the perfect day”. Brilliant. Almost bettered by their closing number, Bit By Bit,  where the band said their “goodbye to all the la-di-da” and left the stage to retreat for a while in their jousting tent.

For more photos of music gigs and events in Canada, please visit J. Ashley Nixon Photography

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Niitsitapi First Nation dancers & drummers help get new academic year going at MRU @mountroyal4u

Dancers and drummers from the Niits (Blackfoot First Nation) lead a parade of students past The Cougars statue and through the corridors of Mount Royal University

Dancers and drummers from the Niitsitapi (Blackfoot First Nation) lead a parade of students through the corridors of Mount Royal University, Calgary  © J. Ashley Nixon

Mount Royal University has earned a strong reputation for having a close contact between faculty and students including smaller teaching group sizes compared with many other institutions. So Calgary’s other university can be forgiven for starting off the new academic year with a whopping big bang of a lecture.

An estimated 1600 students congregated in the blue and white decked main gym, home of The Cougars, to receive encouragement and welcomes from senior staff members.  Frank Warner, the creator of PostSecret, an internet sensation that allows people to share, anonymously, secrets from their lives, gave an inspiring talk about how this release can change the way people act and how they can help each other when troubled. Drummers and dancers from the Niitsitapi- the Blackfoot First Nation, on whose traditional lands the Lincoln Park campus is located, led a parade of students through the corridors, lined up with many of the university staff enthusiastically cheering them along their first steps towards a degree in four years time.

Student guide leads a group of new students in their orientation day at Mount Royal University © J. Ashley Nixon

Student guide leads a group of new students in their orientation day at Mount Royal University
© J. Ashley Nixon

Dr Mike Quinn,  Associate Vice President of Research, Scholarship and Community Engagement was amongst the academics eagerly waiting for the students to come out of their #New2MRU orientation. “This is like our New Years Eve!” he said, with a big smile on his face.

Welcome to your new academic year, students. Welcome to Mount Royal University!

Students at Mount Royal University, Calgary during their orientation at the start of the 2016/17 academic year © J. Ashley Nixon

Students at Mount Royal University, Calgary during their orientation at the start of the 2016/17 academic year
© J. Ashley Nixon

Posted in Alberta, Calgary, Canada, Documentary photography, photography, Social documentary photography | Tagged , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

La chacra de Manuel, Jaén, #Perú

Manuel in his chacra (small-holding) showing camote (sweet potato) plants below Hotel Urqu, Jaén, Cajamarca, Peru. © J. Ashley Nixon

Manuel en su chacra, que muestra  camote por debajo el Hotel Urqu, Jaén, Cajamarca, Peru.
© J. Ashley Nixon

Piscina y producción

Manuel tiene al menos dos puestos de trabajo para mantener su familia en Jaén, en la región de Cajamarca, Perú. Por las mañanas esta limpiendo la piscina en la base de la nueva, de diseño elegante Hotel Urqu. Más tarde, él tiende su chacra, o pequeña propiedad, inmediatamente por debajo de la piscina. Crece una gama de producir allí en la fuerte pendiente que baja a los campos de arroz en el valle del río Amojú, un afluente del río Marañón, la fuente principal del río Amazonas.

Yuca y camote, crecido y servido

A medida que el sol de la mañana se levantaba, Manuel me explicó la diferencia entre la yuca (mandioca) y camote (batata), ya que ambos se parecen similar en el campo. Yuca (no es el mismo que el arbusto de yuca con sus hojas como espadas) es la tercera fuente más importante de hidratos de carbono en los trópicos después del arroz y el maíz. Mientras que las plantas de yuca abrazan el suelo, el camote, un pariente lejano de la papa, crece más alto. Ambos estaban creciendo bien en estos suelos de ladera secos, orientadas al sur, en las colinas bajas de los Andes (altitud: 729 m).

En su plato, estos dos, verduras ampliamente utilizados son, por supuesto, fácil de distinguir. El tubérculo de yuca se pela, luego se hierve y se sirve como acompañamiento (con arroz) en platos como estofado de pollo o estofado de gallina, Pescado a la plancha y el lomo saltado. El camote color naranja se suele hierve y se sirve en su piel junto con el maíz (choclo) en uno de los platos más conocidos de Perú y deliciosos, ceviche. Tanto la yuca y camote se pueden freír y crean un gran plato de entrante como yuca con ajo picante y croquetas de yuca con queso.

Manuel by his chacra (small-holding) and the swimming pool at Hotel Urqu, Jaén, Peru. © J. Ashley Nixon

Manuel por su chacra y las piscina del Hotel Urqu, Jaén, Peru.
© J. Ashley Nixon

Arroz y otros productos agrícolas en el Valle Amojú

En un extremo de la piscina, sandia, el gran melón, estaba creciendo en la hierba del césped, además de los aspersores. Plátano, calabaza, maíz y el brillante, dulce degustación maracuyá también estaban allí justo más allá de la sombra de unos árboles de mango con vistas.

Mientras vagaba a través chacra de Manuel al lado del Hotel Urqu y miré a través de los campos de arroz en el valle Amojú, sentí tanto energizado y relajado. Listo para recoger mi viaje de nuevo al otro lado de los Andes a Chiclayo en la costa del Pacífico.

Para más fotos de Perú, por favor visite:

J. Ashley Nixon Photography

Posted in agriculture, Documentary photography, Environmental documentary photography, español, farming, Food energy water nexus, food production, gardening, Peru, photography, portrait, Social documentary photography, stress nexus | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Manuel’s chacra, Jaén, #Peru

Manuel by his chacra (small-holding) and the swimming pool at Hotel Urqu, Jaén, Peru. © J. Ashley Nixon

Manuel by his chacra (small-holding) and the swimming pool at Hotel Urqu, Jaén, Peru.
© J. Ashley Nixon

Working pool and produce

Manuel has at least two jobs to keep things going for his family in Jaén, in the Cajamarca region of Peru. In the mornings, he is up bright and early checking and cleaning the swimming pool at the base of the new, elegantly designed Hotel Urqu.  Later on, he tends his chacra, or small holding, immediately below the pool. He grows a range of produce there on the steep slope that goes down to the rice fields in the valley of the River Amojú, a tributary to the River Marañon, the main source of the Amazon River.

Yuca and camote, grown and served

Manuel in his chacra (small-holding) showing camote (sweet potato) plants below Hotel Urqu, Jaén, Cajamarca, Peru. © J. Ashley Nixon

Manuel in his chacra (small-holding) showing camote (sweet potato) plants below Hotel Urqu, Jaén, Cajamarca, Peru.
© J. Ashley Nixon

As the morning sun was rising, Manuel explained to me the difference between yuca (cassava) and camote (sweet potato, yam or batata) since both root vegetables closely resemble one another in the field.  Yuca (not the same as the yucca shrub with its sword-like leaves) is the third most important source of carbohydrate in the tropics after rice and maize. While the yuca plants hug the soil, the camote, a distant relative of the potato, grows up taller. Both were growing well on these dry, south facing slope soils, in the lower hills of the Andes (altitude: 729m). On your plate, these two, widely-used vegetables are, of course, easily distinguished. The yuca tuber is peeled, then boiled and served as an accompaniment (with rice) in dishes such as

On your plate, these two, widely-used vegetables are, of course, easily distinguished. The yuca tuber is peeled, then boiled and served as an accompaniment (with rice) in dishes such as estofado de pollo or estofado de gallina (chicken or hen stew), pescado a la plancha (grilled fish) and lomo saltado (thinly sliced beef with onions and peppers). The orange coloured camote is usually boiled and served in its skin alongside maize (corn or choclo) in one of Peru’s best known and delicious dishes, ceviche, or lemon-marinaded fish and seafood. Both the yuca and camote can be fried and create a great starter dish such as yuca con ajo picante (sticks of fried yuca served with a hot pepper dip) and croquettes de yuca con queso (balls of mashed yuca with cheese).

Rice and other produce in the Amojú Valley

At one end of the pool, sandia, a large melon, was growing up in the lawn grass besides the sprinklers. Banana, squash, maize and the bright, sweet tasting maracujá (passion fruit) were also there just beyond the shade of some overlooking mango trees.

As I wandered through Manuel’s chacra below Hotel Urqu and looked across the rice fields in the Amojú Valley,  I felt both energized and relaxed. Ready to pick up my journey again back across the Andes to Chiclayo on the Pacific coast.

View across the rice fields in the Ara Valley, Jaén, Cajamarca, Peru. © J. Ashley Nixon

View through mango trees and across the rice fields of the Amojú Valley, Jaén, Cajamarca, Peru.
© J. Ashley Nixon

For other photos from Peru and the food, energy, water nexus, please visit:

J. Ashley Nixon Photography

Posted in agriculture, Documentary photography, Environmental documentary photography, español, farming, Food energy water nexus, food production, gardening, Peru, photography, portrait, Social documentary photography, spanish, stress nexus | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Colombia gano el torneo de rugby Sudamericano M18 en #Peru @rugbyperu

Colombia, campeones del torneo de rugby Sudamericano M18, 2016. Chiclayo, Peru. © J. Ashley Nixon

Colombia, campeones del torneo de rugby Sudamericano M18, 2016. Chiclayo, Peru. William León celebra con uno de sus jugadores.
© J. Ashley Nixon

Torneo Sudamericano de rugby M18 (Ronda 3)

El torneo de rugby Sudamericano B M18 llegó a su tercera y última ronda de hoy en Chiclayo, Perú. Jugando un rugby impresionante en sus dos primeros juegos, Colombia y México se reunieron en la final, con Perú y Venezuela en un partido decisivo por el tercer puesto en el torneo.

Venezuela versus Perú

En primer lugar hasta el día de un verdadero invierno caliente en un excelente césped artificial en el campo de rugby del Colegio San José fueron los Tumis del Perú jugando con el Vino Tinto de Venezuela. Ambos equipos estaban desesperados por dar un buen espectáculo, y conseguir algunos puntos en el tablero y su primera victoria del torneo.

Perú abrió el marcador con un try convertido al cabo de diez minutos. Venezuela volvió con su primer intento después de 14 minutos, sin convertir. Perú fue por arriba de la línea dos veces en rápida sucesión sólo para que los tries rechazados para un pase hacia adelante y luego un doble movimiento ilegal. Pero, después de 29 minutos y con la conversión, Perú entró en el descanso del partido por 14-5. Los Tumis mantuvieron sus turbinas funcionando en la segunda mitad con tres tries más. Severino Diego Salazar consiguió tres tries y Giovanni Martina Lescano añadió un try y tres conversiones. Un rendimiento mucho mejor para construir el futuro de este joven equipo del Perú.

Resultado final : Venezuela 5-31 Perú

Diego Severino Salazar scores one of his three tries for Peru in their game against Venezuela in the South America U18 rugby tournament, Chiclayo, Peru. © J. Ashley Nixon

Diego Severino Salazar anota uno de sus tres tries para Perú en su partido contra Venezuela en el torneo de rugby Sudamericano M18, 2016, Chiclayo, Peru.
© J. Ashley Nixon

Colombia versus México

Con los dos adelanteros con una carga pesada, pero con bastante móbilidad, una batalla hacia delante por adelantado. Ambos equipos tuvieron velocidad en la línea de tres cuartos de arriba también. En un juego emocionante, el plomo cambió dos veces antes del medio tiempo cuando estaba empatado a 19 puntos cada uno. México tomó la ventaja a 26-19 poco después de la vuelta alrededor con un try convertido. Los colombianos batallaron hasta lanzar el balón fuera de la banda con un try en la esquina izquierda. Era demasiado lejos para hacer la conversión, dejando a Los Tucanes de ir perdiendo por dos puntos, 24-22. Parecía que México había sellado su victoria en el campeonato, pero en el último minuto de juego, Colombia anotó un try y se adjudico el campeonato.

Resultado final : Colombia 27-24 México

Colombia try in their final game against Mexico at the South America U18 rugby tournament, Chiclayo, Peru © J. Ashley Nixon

Un try para Colombia en su último partido contra México en el torneo de rugby Sudamericano M18, 2016 en Chiclayo, Perú
© J. Ashley Nixon

Los resultados finales del torneo

Colombia, con tres victorias son los campeones del torneo de rugby Sudamericano B M18 de este año. México quedo en el segundo puesto. Perú quedo en tercer puesto y Venezuelo quedando en ultimo puesto. Felicitaciones a todos los equipos por un espléndido torneo y en especial a Felipe Barrera (capitán), William León (Técnico) y todos los otros jugadores en el equipo Los Tucanes de Colombia.

Para ver más fotos del torneo de rugby Sudamericano U18, por favor visite:

J. Ashley Nixon Photography

Posted in español, Peru, photography, rugby, spanish, sports, Sports photography | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Colombia win the South America U18 rugby tournament in #Peru @rugbyperu

Colombia, champions of the South America U18 rugby tournament, 2016. Chiclayo, Peru. © J. Ashley Nixon

Colombia, champions of the South America U18 rugby tournament, 2016. Chiclayo, Peru.
© J. Ashley Nixon

South America U18 international rugby tournament (Round 3)

The South America B Under 18 rugby tournament reached its third and final round today in Chiclayo, Peru. Playing some impressive rugby in their first two games, Colombia and Mexico were meeting in the final, with Peru and Venezuela in a decider for third place in the tournament.

Venezuela versus Peru

First up on a real hot winter’s day at the splendid, artificial turf rugby pitch at San Jose College were the Tumis from Peru playing the Vino Tinto of Venezuela. Both teams were desperate to put in a good show, get some points on the board and their first win of the tournament.

Peru opened the score with a converted try after ten minutes. Venezuela came back with their first try after 14 minutes, unconverted. Peru went over the line twice in rapid succession only to have the tries turned down for  a forward pass and then an illegal double move. It was third time lucky though after 29 minutes and with the conversion, Peru went into the half time up by 14-5. The Tumis kept their turbines running in the second half with three more tries.  Diego Severino Salazar got a hat trick (three tries) and Giovanni Martina Lescano added one try plus three conversions. A much better performance and one to build on for the future of this young team.

Final score: Venezuela 5 – 31 Peru

Diego Severino Salazar scores one of his three tries for Peru in their game against Venezuela in the South America U18 rugby tournament, Chiclayo, Peru. © J. Ashley Nixon

Diego Severino Salazar scores one of his three tries for Peru in their game against Venezuela in the South America U18 rugby tournament, Chiclayo, Peru.
© J. Ashley Nixon

Colombia versus Mexico

With both packs weighing in a heavy but mobile load this was quite  an upfront forwards battle. Both teams had speed in the three-quarter line-up as well. In a thrilling game, the lead changed twice before half time when it was tied at 19 points each. Mexico took the lead to 26-19 shortly after the turn around with a converted try. The Colombians battled back throwing the ball out to the wing with a try in the left hand corner.  It was too far out to make the conversion, leaving The Toucans trailing by two points, 24-22. It looked like Mexico had sealed their championship win, but in the last minute of play, Colombia scored a try to just clinch the game.

Final score: Colombia 27 – 24 Mexico

Final tournament results

Colombia with three wins are the champions of this year’s South America B U18 tournament. Mexico were runners up. Peru came third and closing things out were Venezuela. Congratulations to all of the teams for a splendid tournament and especially to Felipe Barrera (Captain), William Leon (Head Coach) and all the other players in theToucans team from Colombia.

Colombia try in their final game against Mexico at the South America U18 rugby tournament, Chiclayo, Peru © J. Ashley Nixon

Colombia score a try in their final game against Mexico at the South America U18 rugby tournament, Chiclayo, Peru
© J. Ashley Nixon

For more photos from the South America U18 rugby tournament, please visit:

 

J. Ashley Nixon Photography

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