Poetry Yorkshire

A source of Aire

A source of Aire

You come from karst
A tarn, to start
Then trickle through
A fence, a wall
Before you hide
Under your bed
In Sink Hole.

Gurgling like
A bunch of lads
You play a prank
And run downhill
To meet your mates
The Becks
Malham and Gordale.

Then off you go
Through textile towns
Over weirs
Under cut
Slowly getting
Softened up
By millstone grit.

The River Aire

The River Aire starts life on the Pennine moors at Malham Tarn in the Yorkshire Dales National Park. A stream comes from the tarn, trickles under a fence, through a wall and then disappears underground into the limestone at Sink Hole. It reappears, not under Malham Cove as some people believe, but on the other side of Malham Village at Aire Head. There, it meets up with Malham Beck and Gordale Beck. The Aire continues along the route of the Pennine Way into the millstone grit at Gargrave, then goes through Skipton, Keighley and other former textile towns in Airedale. The Aire runs into the Ouse at Airmyn, then the Humber and into the North Sea on the east coast of Yorkshire.

Airedale: Terrier and Terrain

The source of the River Aire and its journey can be seen in my documentary film Airedale: Terrier and Terrain. This will be screened during the opening of the RATMA Film Festival at The Picture House, Keighley, on October 8, 2022.

Photo Gallery

2 comments on “A source of Aire

  1. sallychristie@btinternet.com sallychristie@btinternet.com

    The more I watch the film the more I like & relate to it.Maybe you could tweak it by adding this fab poem then re enter the competition next year?Well done.

    Like

  2. It’s good to know that you keep liking the film after seeing it again. A nice idea to include the poem.

    Like

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